Forgotten Wisdom: "Occasional Editorial #1"

Below is The Cape Cod Times on offshore  renewable energy - before enviro-hypocrisy set in .

From an editorial titled "Electrical Currents," published in the Cape Cod Times on June 18, 2001, just weeks before Cape Wind unveiled its proposal. 

"Offshore wind and wave energy could supplement our power grid. If there is a silver lining to the nation's current energy crisis ..." ( and if that was a crisis, how would they describe what we're facing now, a Super-Sized Crisis? )  " ... it is the illumination of alternative energy resources from the shadows of deregulation.

"Though we often take it for granted, surrounded as we are by it, the ocean represents an untapped powerhouse of energy." (How about that!)

"And even though this planet's two largest oceans provide bookends to the world's greatest energy consumer, it is Germany, Japan and Scotland that have embraced offshore wind farms and wave energy to supplement conventional power.

"Germany's Environmental Minister Juergen Trittin said last week that up to three-fifths of today's nuclear power could be replaced by wind energy by 2030. The Ministry plans to build about 40 wind generators offshore in a pilot project before 2004."

 "It is estimated two-tenths of one percent of the energy contained in the ocean," the editorial states, "including thermal from the sun's heat and mechanical from tidal and waves, could power the whole world."

"In good locations, wave energy density can produce an average 65 megawatts per mile of coastline, enough to power nearly 50,000 homes," the editorial pointed out (and in another good location, an offshore wind farm can provide nearly three-quarters of the electricity used on the Cape and islands).

"It's time the United States re-invest in the kinds of alternative energy sources being tapped in Germany, Scotland and elsewhere," the editorial concluded.

The first - and nearly forgotten - in a series of occasional editorials on offshore renewable energy.

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