Finally...a home for Ladybird!

Plus, they found Franklin
Hooray! Ladybird is headed to her forever home. Friends of Falmouth Dogs photo.

And a cry went out o’er the land. And the bells rang. And the people cheered. And the little children danced in the streets, singing: Ladybird has found a home! Ladybird has found a home! So you see? Dreams do come true. Ladybird has begun this next chapter of her life in a new home; correction, in a new, fantastic home.

But Caper can’t help but wonder what all the kerfuffle is about. After all, he’s just as special and just as deserving and needs a home just as much. But we are heartened by the idea that even if it is long in the making, a home comes along for each and every dog. And that home is good and true and loving. Caper is an older German shepherd. Is there a nobler breed? A noted authority on dogs, Roger Caras, reminds us that the German shepherd is “first, last and always” a dog with the ability to assist people in all ways and “has never been outclassed by any other breed” in that regard. And although Caper’s days of hard work are behind him, he deserves in his retirement the love and comfort of family. An ideal home would be one where someone is around a lot as he gets very lonely. And he would like a home where you will be the decision-maker so that he does not have to fill that role himself. So Caper, hang on, buddy, we know the family is out there.

There is a breed of horse called the American saddlebred, which is known for its elegant, high-stepping gait. Leah displays this same elegant gait. This 10-year-old miniature pinscher, at about 11 pounds, is a tiny bit of a dog with feet as small as those of a squirrel. She has the rich, saturated black and tan markings typical of her breed. When she moves, she fairly glides. And although she does have a bit of arthritis in her back legs, this gal likes her walks and can keep up with a typical human stride without difficulty. She loves being handled, but we try not to treat her like a small accessory. She is a dog, first and foremost.

We have learned of another dog in need of a new home. He is a 1 1/2-year-old bully mix, white with brown spots and handsome all over. As soon as we know more, we will post the information (and maybe even photos) on our website, so stay tuned.

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Many of you may have been aware and even may have participated in the search last week for the missing dog named Franklin. First the good news: Franklin was found last Friday, a bit thin and very tired, and was reunited with his owner within a few minutes of his rescue (which was about 1 1/2 miles from his home). The owner had followed every step to the letter: the dog had ID tags; as soon as the dog went missing, she made posters with his photo and posted them as many places as she could; she notified all the authorities, her neighbors and us. She was out day and night searching for him, knocking on doors to alert residents in areas where he had been sighted. In addition, friends, strangers and several FFD volunteers also spent days and nights driving around the neighborhoods where reports indicated he had been seen. We're convinced that because she followed best practices in the search for her dog (and never gave up hope), Franklin was found safe. On behalf of this very grateful owner, we would like to thank all of you who helped bring Franklin home.

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A rabies clinic for dogs and cats will be held on Saturday, April 12, from 1 to 3 PM at the Animal Control Center in West Falmouth. A microchip clinic for dogs will be held at the same time. Please make sure all dogs are on leash and cats are in carriers. Cost is $10 for each rabies shot and $10 for the microchip.

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Stop by the shelter during our open hours and get a glimpse of the special dogs now in residence. We are open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to noon; Sunday from 3 to 5 PM; and Monday and Thursday afternoons from 4 to 6. (Volunteers are also at the shelter Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday from 4 to 5 to spend time with the dogs, give them their evening meal—and sometimes a small snack!—and say goodnight.)


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