Tree of Memories Keep on Giving – to People and Wildlife

Memorial trees from Hope Hospice help recovering wildlife
Red-tailed Hawk recovering from wounds - checks out his new trees! Leo Seletsky photo.

On Tuesday, January 3rd, Wild Care, Inc., a wildlife rescue and rehabilitation center in Eastham, received 14 trees from Hope Hospice’s Tree of Memories program. The trees will be used to fill Wild Care’s raptor and songbird aviaries to provide enrichment for recovering sick and injured wildlife. Tree of Memories began 26 years ago to celebrate the memory of loved ones while supporting the worthy cause of hospice. Through Tree of Memories, people purchase scallop shells ornaments inscribed with the name of their loved one, and they are hung on lighted trees in the town of their choice. Hope Hospice chaplains hosted remembrance ceremonies at 19 locations this year, from Brockton to Provincetown, to Martha’s Vineyard. At the ceremonies, the name of the loved one is read aloud with blessings and inspirational words shared.

“Wild Care is so fortunate to receive these Hope Hospice trees for our recovering animals,” states Wild Care Executive Director, Stephanie Ellis. “The trees are placed throughout our raptor and songbird aviaries, and provide enrichment, perches and hiding places, for many months to come. We believe they boost morale in our patients, and help with their recovery process, by providing a familiar, natural environment. These trees keep on giving, to both people and wildlife, and we love what they represent.”

All gallery photos by Leo Seletsky.

To learn about Wild Care, Inc: www.wildcarecapecod.org & Facebook at “Wild Care Cape Cod.”

To learn about Hope Hospice and Tree of Memories: http://hopehealthma.org/treeofmemories.

The trees were kindly delivered by Marc Goode, & Ricky Van Buren of Eldredge & Bourne - Moving & Storage. http://www.eldredgebourne.com

WILD CARE’s wildlife rehabilitators treat birds, mammals and reptiles brought to the center, with the goal of releasing them back into the wild when they are capable of independent survival. Through public education, WILD CARE works to prevent wildlife casualties and works to engage the community in conservation through volunteerism. Since our founding WILD CARE has accepted over 25,000 wild creatures, representing over 275 species of native birds, mammals and reptiles. If you encounter injured, orphaned or ill wildlife please call the WILD CARE of Cape Cod helpline at508-240-2255.  Visit www.wildcarecapecod.org to make a donation.


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