March 3 - 1941: Liner aground in Cape Cod Canal on the first day of its maiden voyage

1947: Wave rips 75 feet from collier's bow. Storm hit at Cape Cod Canal. 2007: Attorney General appeals NRC decision on Pilgrim Nuclear Plant relicensing
The President Hayes after it was converted to the USS Upshur during World War II.

1941: Ocean Liner President Hayes runs aground in Cape Cod Canal

29,000 mile voyage ends on the first day of its maiden voyage

On this day in 1941, the 9,300-ton liner President Hayes ran aground in the Cape Cod Canal off Hog Island - 50 miles into its 29,000-mile maiden voyage.

The ship left Boston the night before en route to New York on the first leg of an around the world voyage with a crew of 120 and 1,500 tons of general cargo.

An agent of the ship's owners, the American President Lines, told the Associated Press that the ship was refloated without assistance and was leaking slightly in the forepeak. No injuries were reported.

"If sufficiently seaworthy, the steamship would be sent to New York for repairs," the AP reported.

In 1950, the President Hayes was acquired by the Navy, renamed the USS Upshur and converted for troop transport. The ship was transferred to the Maine Maritime Academy in 1973 for use as a training vessel.

1947: Wave rips 75 feet from collier's bow; Storm hit at Cape Cod Canal

She ran into the storm at the Cape Cod Canal, sank further north in Maine

On this day in 1947, a UP story began:

"A tremendous wave whipped up by New England's worst coastal storm of the winter snapped off the bow of the collier Oakley L. Alexander today, but her thirty-two man crew rode a Coast Guard breeches buoy to safety across 150 yards of wild surf."

The Alexander, on right coming aground in Cape Elizabeth Maine, an American registered cargo ship of 5,284 gross reg tons, owned by the Pocahontas Steamship Co., and skippered by Captain Raymond Lewis, was having slow going in it's fight against the raging seas. The large ship was on top of a huge wave when a sudden lurch was felt throughout. Capt Lewis and the men on the bridge watched in horror as a 130 ft long section of the bow broke clear off and almost immediately sank from sight.

Read the rest of the story here and below...

2007: Attorney General appeals NRC decision on Pilgrim re-licensing

Move came at urging of local state representatives

martha_coakley85 On this day in 2007 the office of the Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley (on right) filed an appeal with the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit,  asking that the court review two orders by the NRC regarding licensing proceedings concerning Pilgrim and Vermont Yankee. 

The Attorney General's office "contends that by refusing to address, in an environmental impact statement (EIS) the environmental impacts of serious spent fuel pool accidents caused by a wide range of factors including terrorist attacks, natural phenomena, operator error, and equipment failure, the NRC violated the Atomic Energy Act, the National Environmental Policy Act , the Administrative Procedure Act, and the NRC regulations for implementation of those statutes."

 In the filing the AG asks the court to;

  • Review and reverse the NRC rulings on the AGO's Motions on Pilgrim and VY;
  • Order the NRC to prepare an EIS for the renewal of the Pilgrim operating license that addresses the environmental impacts of serious spent fuel pool accidents caused by a wide range of factors including terrorist attacks, natural phenomena, operator error, and equipment failure.
  • Declare that the NRC may not permit Entergy to continue to operate Pilgrim past the expiration of its current license in 2012 unless and until the NRC fully complies with its statutory and regulatory obligations for the renewal of the license; and
  • Grant such other relief as the Court may deem appropriate. 

This action followed by one week a letter sent to both AG Coakley and the NRC requesting similar actions.


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