November 25 -1888: "Storm Warriors" rescue 29 men during "Blizzard of '88"

2000: Boat sinking SOS called a hoax
USLSS crew hauling their dory

1888: Cape Cod alone has witnessed more than 3,000 shipwreck

Life-Saving Service went to the rescue of over 28,000 ships

Mass Moments on the heroes who saved 29 sailors in 1888:

On this day in 1888, one of the most ferocious storms of the nineteenth century battered the New England Coast. In the seas off Hull, "Storm Warriors," as the men of the United States Life-Saving Service (USLSS) were known, saved 29 lives.

One crew rowed 6 ½ miles out to a wrecked vessel and rescued seven sailors. For almost a century, Massachusetts Humane Society volunteers had been helping to rescue mariners in distress. When the federal government formally organized the United States Life-Saving Service in 1878, paid surfmen took over most of the work.

The record of human lives they saved was impressive: 99% of the people they tried to rescue survived. In 1915 the USLSS became part of the United States Coast Guard.

Read more here.
The map below shows some of the over 3,000 Cape Cod shipwrecks.

2000: Fishing boat sinking a hoax

On this day in 2000, the Coast Guard searched for survivors of the apparent sinking of the fishing boat Maureen out of Gloucester after receiving word from another fishing vessel of a life raft spotted on Cape Cod Bay a few miles north of Barnstable Harbor. The 46-foot trawler Maureen had left Plymouth on Nov. 23, Thanksgiving Day.

A life raft with the Maureen's name was recovered during a three-day search by Coast Guard vessels and aircraft, as was a single piece of wooden wreckage believed to have come from the vessel.

But Coast Guard officials began harboring doubts after receiving inconsistent claims from the vessel's owner, leading to suspicions of a hoax.


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