December 14 - 1933: Columbia crew coach shot to death in Chatham

37 year-old coach discovered in Chatham covered with snow, shot by own gun while climbing a fence. 1976: Argo Merchant runs aground on Nantucket Shoals
Glendon, shown at left in the photo, was the son of Richard A. "Dick" Glendon (at center in photo) and brother of Hubert Glendon (at right), both of whom were also well-known crew coaches of the era.

1933: Columbia crew coach shot to death in Chatham

On this day in 1933, the body of Richard Glendon, the coach of the Columbia crew team, was discovered in Chatham covered with snow. The death, which was suspicious and resembled a suicide, was called accidental by the medical examiner of the era.

The elder Glendon coached at Annapolis from 1904 and 1923; among his rowers was a future admiral named Chester Nimitz. Glendon was succeeded at Annapolis by his son Rich, who had returned to Columbia by the time of his death a decade later.

Five years after the death of Richard Glendon, his son Thomas Glendon and a school friend were lost at sea in November 1938 while duck hunting off Chatham.

The story in the New York Times that day read:

R.J. GLENDON SHOT DEAD ON CAPE COD;
Columbia Crew Coach Killed Accidentally on Hunt,
Medical Examiner Holds.
LETTER FOUND BY FATHER
' Young Dick' Recently Had Marital Rift
University Is Grieved by Tragedy

SOUTH CHATHAM, Mass., Dec. 14. -- Bearing a gunshot wound in the right side and abdomen, the body of Richard J. (Rich) Glendon, coach of the Columbia crew, was found today in a bleak, snow-covered spot near an old ice house not far from the beach.

The finding of the body, covered with snow, culminated an all-night search by his father, Richard A (Old Dick) Glendon, famous Navy crew coach, his brother, Hubert, assistant crew coach at Columbia, and friends.

1976: Argo Merchant runs aground on Nantucket Shoals

Read the rest of what happened today here. including in 1976 when the Oil tanker Argo Merchant ran aground on the Nantucket Shoals, spilling 7.6 million US gallons of No. 6 fuel oil.

Photo courtesy of Wiki Commons.


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