Good News in Falmouth - If you Look for it.

A two-hour observation of the mosaic that is Falmouth in the summertime

I'm growing weary of the feeling of malaise and malcontent coming from the corner conference room in Town Hall. You know what, though? The bad behavior of a couple of Selectmen isn't Falmouth's bad behavior. Their boorish bad news isn't our communities' bad news. It's easy, sometimes inescapable, to get caught up in the cyclone of discontent when we see it swirling on our TV screens every Monday night, but I am became determined earlier this week to find and share some good news. With that in mind, and armed with a day off, pen and paper and an ice cold (bottled) water, I laced up my sneakers (the knot always seems to be to the side because I can't quite reach far enough to tie it in the middle), and headed to a park bench next to the ‘Peace' rock at Peg Noonan Park in search of some people, places and things that are examples of what‘s right with Falmouth. I found them.

The bad behavior of a couple of Selectmen isn't Falmouth's bad behavior.
Their boorish bad news isn't our communities' bad news.

I found the good news as I was walking toward my destination and saw a line, dozens long, waiting outside of Betsy's Diner, visiting from afar to share in the Falmouth experience and to "eat heavy."

As I settled in to my two-hour observation of the mosaic that is Falmouth in the summertime, I found it in a smiling young woman, pushing her beautiful baby in a carriage, walking with another woman who was likely the third generation on that excursion, exclaiming gleefully into her cell phone, "I'm in Falmouth - and everything is so beautiful here." She reminded me of that. I concur and promised to myself at that moment to take more time to appreciate that fact. We all should.

I found good news running into fireworks guru Dutch Drollette while enjoying breakfast (why do these columns always include food?) with my pal Kenny at the Country Fare and congratulated Dutch on what were, in the opinion of this observer, the best Falmouth fireworks ever. Upon offering my complements, the never-shy Chairman of the Fireworks Committee suggested I relay that fact in this space. OK, Mr. Chairman, here goes. Kudos to Dutch and the entire committee, including 30-year veteran Arthur Ratsy who I had the pleasure of chatting with on Saturday, for another extraordinary year.

I observed a wave of good news watching hundreds of eager readers enjoy the Friends of the Falmouth Public Library's annual book sale on the library lawn. I snagged a couple of $2 specials there myself, then watched as an enterprising young barrister cradled an old, weathered copy of Black's Law Dictionary under his arm like a newborn. I could see, almost share, his vision of a proud and successful future as a lawyer. I caught a glance of another avid reader, stashing at least ten new finds from the book sale in the back of his station wagon. It was almost as if he was placing some peace of mind in the back of his car to be pulled out a little later.

I found good news as a stranger (and now new friend) sat down beside me and struck up a conversation. North Andover resident Dave Ruane had some great thoughts about how we can better support public safety and our seniors in Falmouth and wondered to whom he should speak. I suspect his letter will be arriving in the corner office at 59 Town Hall Square soon.

Dave and I smiled as a Dad and a couple of kids walked by with wide, sticky smiles as they enjoyed their newly purchased treats from Ghelfi's. We smiled again as a  Falmouthite named Adam walked by hand-in-hand with his radiant wife, enjoying the beauty of Main Street in the summer and of some precious time with a loved one.

I learned, perhaps remembered is a more appropriate term, an important lesson during my two hour sojourn on Main Street this week. The good news is all around us in Falmouth. You just have to be willing to look for it.

This column is reprinted from the Falmouth Enterprise.

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