Cuttyhunk Fishing Report | Day 2

After spending Day 1 at Cuttyhunk scouting and exploring the island, I was pretty eager to actually do some fishing on Day 2. On Day 1 the wind was blowing from the west at 20 mph which made fishing Cuttyhunk’s western-facing shoreline very challenging. The mung and sea weed that was blown into shore by the breeze only made things more difficult.

I checked the marine forecast before falling asleep and incredibly the weathermen were calling for winds of around 5 mph through the night and into Day 2. However this late in the season you never know what the wind and weather are going to do.

Fortunately for me the weathermen were spot on. I woke up a few times throughout the night and noticed the leaves standing still on the trees outside my window. It was going to be a nice morning.


Sunrise over the Elizabeth’s

I woke up to dead calm conditions and a brightening sky over the Elizabeth Islands. I think I’d be hard pressed to find a better scene to wake up to.

A piece of toast and a banana later and I was ready to go. I took the sea shell path through the Pete’s Place cottages down towards the main road.

There was a soft swell rolling in from Vineyard Sound. The entire Sound was calm and tranquil-a big change from the day before.

On Day 1 I fished the opening to Cuttyhunk Pond as well as Canapitsit Channel. Due to improved conditions, I planned on spending Day 2 fishing the entire shoreline west from the Cuttyhunk Fishing Club.

If I made it around the entire island then great. If I found fish and ended up sticking to one particular stretch of beach even better.

I began walking to the west just as the sun poked its head over Nashawena Island.

Bass Among the Boulders

I took my first cast of the morning next to the first huge boulders I encountered. I did not have any takes on that first cast and I also did not snag any mung or sea weed. The water was clean which was great news.

On my third cast into the boulders I noticed a swirl behind the Sebile. It had been a bass, basically just checking out my lure. There was life in the area and bass among the boulders.

Expect the Unexpected

I then decided to get a little closer to the action by getting my feet wet in the wash between a few rocks, as I have countless times before. As I whipped a cast into Vineyard Sound I felt my Go Pro camera topple from my back pack and hit the rocky beach with a crack and smack.

An instant later a swell from the Sound rolled in and onto the beach. The rush of water inundated my Go Pro before I could reach down and save it from the wave. Within a second the Go Pro, and all the photos and videos stored on the SD card were gone.

I was bummed but what can ya do. I received a solid 2 years of work from that little camera and I feel as if I got my money’s worth.

At least I still had my iPhone camera which would have to suffice for now.

Glad I Brought a First Aid Kit

At some point during the loss of the Go Pro my lure’s two sets of treble hooks had become embedded in the mesh netting of my back pack. Without really giving it much thought I took my pliers and yanked the hooks free from the mesh-and directly into my finger.

I stood there for a few moments and just stared at the treble hook in my finger, and the lure hanging from it. Fortunately the barb of the hook was not fully embedded in my flesh. A swift and quick yank was all that was needed to remove it.

Back to Fishing


I got back to casting soon after bandaging myself up, and luckily for me the fish were still around.

However I was having trouble hooking them. Bass would come up and crush the Sebile but I could not get a hook into them. Then a few casts later another fish would swirl on the lure without biting.

Was I doing something wrong? Was this going to be a day full of karma?

It sure had been a strange start to my day.

I marched onward to some of the spots I had explored the previous day, hoping that my luck with the fish would change.

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