May 3 - 1886: Steamer sinks schooner with 800 tons of coal off Cape Cod

2007: Mashpee Tribe wants their land back
The Jennie R. Morse sunk in 1886 when she was hit by an unknown steamer.

1886: Steamer sinks Schooner

On this day in 1886, the New York Times reported:

"The schooner Jennie R. Morse, from Philadelphia for Boston, was run into and sunk by an unknown steamer on the night of May 1-2, off Cape Cod.

All hands were saved. She had a cargo of 800 tons of coal."

Other sunken Schooners in our neighborhood and in Stellwagen Bank

The multi-masted coal schooners Frank A. Palmer and Louise B. Crary collided on the 17th of  December in 1902 and their connected remains lie in the deep waters of the sanctuary. The two Maine-built vessels represent some of the largest 19th century coastal trading vessels. Each vessel is still loaded with 3000 tons of coal shipped from Virginia.

The two schooners collided on the 17th of December in 1902 in Massachusetts Bay enroute from Newport News, Virginia to Boston, Massachusetts. Within minutes of the collision, 6 of the 21 sailors lost their lives when the schooners plummeted to the bottom. The remaining 15 sailors made it into the Frank A. Palmer's lifeboat. During the following 4 nights, 5 more men perished from exposure in the open boat before being rescued 60 miles off Cape Cod, MA.

Read about these schooners and Stellwagen Bank here.

2007: Tribe wants their land back

Leader Glenn Marshall demands return of 22,000 acres

On this day in 2007, soon to be disgraced and jailed Glenn Marshall (read about him here), leader of the Mashpee Wampanoags, said the tribe wants their Cape Cod land back, and he means the 22,000 acre Mass. Military Reservation.

The tribe plans to lay claim to the reservation, home to Otis Air National Guard Base. The reservations 22,000 acres span the towns of Bourne Mashpee and Sandwich. The tribe owns 150 acres abutting MMR land.

Marshall told the Associated Press, "Our lands were taken illegally by the commonwealth and the federal government. Parts of that base were taken from us."


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