Mindful Eating

Though the word mindful is fast becoming overused, it does accurately describe the best approach to life, including eating. Mindful eating means eating with intention and attention.

My daughter and I recently went to a yoga retreat where one of the classes we attended was on mindful eating. We started the class by carefully examining an almond and then chewing it for 30 chews. While this is a bit extreme, there were several reasons for this exercise. One was to eat more slowly (Michael Pollan, noted author and food activist, says to spend as much time enjoying the food as it took to prepare it.) Another was awareness of what you are eating; chewing the food with intention to really notice the texture and the various tastes – bitter, sweet, savory, salty, spicy, sour.  And another, ask questions of your food – Does this food nourish my body? Will it satiate me? Will it properly fuel my lifestyle? Is it enjoyable? By doing this, you are practicing mindful eating and more likely to eat less, enjoy more and honor the cook!

 

Mindful eating also means awareness of when and why you eat, or knowing your body’s non-hunger triggers for eating. Are you eating out of boredom or habit even when you aren’t hungry? Before you eat something, ask yourself first if you are hungry. If so, eat, if not, don’t, and stop eating when your body tells you to stop. By being mindful of your body’s physical and emotional cues, you are more likely to control when, why and how much you eat.

The opposite of mindful eating is mindless eating, which in our busy and fast-paced society usually happens. Food is something we must have, so we often eat on the run, in our car, at our desk or in front of the television. For your next meal, turn off the TV, set the table, light a candle, place your fork down between bites, and savor the experience. Your body and your mind will thank you!

 

 

For more green living tips, visit greenwithbetsy.com.

 

Some information compiled from amihungry.com/what-is-mindfuleating/

 

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