Journey's blog

Who adds to Addiction?

Today, I just hung up from talking to a friend who had attended a funeral for the son of her boss. He was 42 years old and had been an alcoholic and drug user for years. Countless times he had been into short rehabs stays, coming out dry, and only returning to his same neighborhood and friends, to open him up again to falling-back to using. 

It’s not important to know his name or where he lives. There are too many fighting this disease, not just in your neighborhood or family, but worldwide; young, old, white, black, rich, poor, famous and an average person with no fame, married or single. 

He had just gotten back with his ex-wife to start life over with their two children. She came home and found he had hung himself. Where do I find the correct words to explain the pain deep within families who have lost loved ones to this cruel and heartless demon? Only the ones who have lived through the fear, confusion, breakdowns, and abuse, know what I am talking about with this kind of tragedy. You can feel sad and sorry for families, but until, you walk in our shoes, you will not share in our emotions and stories. 

This poor man who had been fighting to get his life back to normal must have felt hopeless, worthless, and gave up on ever living a life without a struggle with addiction. The news brought me right back tlosing Richie and Lori to their addiction. 

They didn’t commit suicide like him, but everyone seems to have a different reason for turning to alcohol, drugs, or prescription pills to handle their problems. No one wants to come out of the closet and say, “I need help.” No one wants to bring up the past with some tragedy that happened in their life to only reopen it again with the pain, not knowing what did or didn’t happen to their young memories. 

There are many catastrophes that happen to an alcoholic or drug user that maybe the parents, siblings, or friends can’t understand why the addicted can’t “get over” something in the past when something happens to them holding them back from getting on with their life without using. 

To many struggle with a death of a parent or close friend, being forced into an abortion, being beaten by a child, listening to parents fight, seeing a parent or someone close to you coming home in blackouts causing the fear, confusion, and violence in the family behind closed doors can be devastating to the child who can’t defend themselves or find security within the family. They grow up with no feeling of love.

Remember how they were treated as a child in life or their teenage years.  These events, mold them into what and who they become later in life. Not talking about the actions with substance abusers, only makes them do the same to their families and generation.  

Richie and Lori died of cirrhosis of the liver. That is a horrible way to die. Richie and Lori had IV’s in both arms, swollen stomachs like pregnant women, their skin and whites to their eyes had turned yellow and their organs slowly shut down. Richie went into a coma and died after 3 weeks in the hospital, and Lori’s doctors from Charlton Memorial in Fall River did a procedure twice to tie tiny elastic bands around her veins in her esophagus. She also lived for three weeks, had a hemorrhage in her rectum, and went into a coma.  She was put on life-support. 

Two days later, we had to say goodbye and let her go home to God.  I heard Lori take her first cry at birth and her last breath on this earth shutting down the life support machine.  This is the hardest decision in this world is to let a loved one die by shutting this device off.

You always live with the fear that if you had waited a little longer, they might have come out of the coma.  I wished God had taken her the three weeks earlier than to live on the hope that she would live, instead of shutting a machine off only to watch her heart rate slow down to a stop.  It makes you feel like you ended her life.  This is alcoholism. 

I remember Dr. Phil’s remark to the woman on his show.  “You realize you’re not going into rehabilitation for a day, week or a month.  It’s until! There is the answer.  Until you are dried-out, can make healthy decisions with your life, and face the deep-rooted problems that are eating away at you.  Only then, you may have a chance for survival. 

Who and what keeps the addicted active?  I saw on television, a football player who had been an alcoholic and addict but recovered.  His desire was to help young kids.  He made a remark to them that made me stop what I was doing. “Show me your friends, and I’ll show you your future!” Think about it.  When they get out of rehab, they run to the same friends doing the same abuse, at the same location.  They meet with the same drug dealers.

Years ago, our kids were street smart.  Today, we are not fact smart.  Our education has to start at the grammar school level.  Our children are not as innocent to things happening in their neighborhood as you think.  In my book What is and isn’t Working for the Alcoholic and Drug Addict, two contributors admitted to trying their first drink at five years old and the other at seven. 

This is why I believe we need a daily class on substance abuse with grammar age children.  By that age, our sons and daughters are mixing in with others who are looking for ways to get their thrills and they look up to the older kids.  Until they have an education these kids have no future if they continue and face death if they don’t stop.  We have to show our children the facts about the high death-rate with alcohol and drug abuse.  Doctors have to stop refilling pain pills.  They don’t take a second glance at what might be going on with the patient.  I blame them with the same actions that family do…doctors are great enablers.  Filling prescription drugs over and over makes them as responsible with their death as the pill they are taking.

Health insurance companies have to make a change in today’s life covering the cost for long term recovery programs.  They need to face the reality that substance abusers need at least a year or longer in a recovery program without coming out until their time is up with more professional help when they do.  In my past life watching Richie and Lori, I came to the conclusion, it’s not counselors substance abusers need but psychiatrist.  

Addicts have to take their own responsibility with the years of using.  They have to get real with the fact, you can’t get dry and then return to the same friends who use or the same corner to get those drug. You have to have no doubt in your mind that this continued action is going to kill you.  Not maybe, but when. 

To the school systems and families, start today teaching our children about alcohol abuse and drug use.  Do we need to put fear into them………..in my opinion, YES.  It can save their life.

Author and Speaker, Alberta Sequeira

www.albertasequeira.wordpress.com

Books: www.amazon.com/author/albertasequeira

 

Who adds to Addiction?

Today, I just hung up from talking to a friend who had attended a funeral for the son of her boss. He was 42 years old and had been an alcoholic and drug user for years. Countless times he had been into short rehabs stays, coming out dry, and only returning to his same neighborhood and friends, to open him up again to falling-back to using. 

It’s not important to know his name or where he lives. There are too many fighting this disease, not just in your neighborhood or family, but worldwide; young, old, white, black, rich, poor, famous and an average person with no fame, married or single. 

He had just gotten back with his ex-wife to start life over with their two children. She came home and found he had hung himself. Where do I find the correct words to explain the pain deep within families who have lost loved ones to this cruel and heartless demon? Only the ones who have lived through the fear, confusion, breakdowns, and abuse, know what I am talking about with this kind of tragedy. You can feel sad and sorry for families, but until, you walk in our shoes, you will not share in our emotions and stories. 

This poor man who had been fighting to get his life back to normal must have felt hopeless, worthless, and gave up on ever living a life without a struggle with addiction. The news brought me right back tlosing Richie and Lori to their addiction. 

They didn’t commit suicide like him, but everyone seems to have a different reason for turning to alcohol, drugs, or prescription pills to handle their problems. No one wants to come out of the closet and say, “I need help.” No one wants to bring up the past with some tragedy that happened in their life to only reopen it again with the pain, not knowing what did or didn’t happen to their young memories. 

There are many catastrophes that happen to an alcoholic or drug user that maybe the parents, siblings, or friends can’t understand why the addicted can’t “get over” something in the past when something happens to them holding them back from getting on with their life without using. 

To many struggle with a death of a parent or close friend, being forced into an abortion, being beaten by a child, listening to parents fight, seeing a parent or someone close to you coming home in blackouts causing the fear, confusion, and violence in the family behind closed doors can be devastating to the child who can’t defend themselves or find security within the family. They grow up with no feeling of love.

Remember how they were treated as a child in life or their teenage years.  These events, mold them into what and who they become later in life. Not talking about the actions with substance abusers, only makes them do the same to their families and generation.  

Richie and Lori died of cirrhosis of the liver. That is a horrible way to die. Richie and Lori had IV’s in both arms, swollen stomachs like pregnant women, their skin and whites to their eyes had turned yellow and their organs slowly shut down. Richie went into a coma and died after 3 weeks in the hospital, and Lori’s doctors from Charlton Memorial in Fall River did a procedure twice to tie tiny elastic bands around her veins in her esophagus. She also lived for three weeks, had a hemorrhage in her rectum, and went into a coma.  She was put on life-support. 

Two days later, we had to say goodbye and let her go home to God.  I heard Lori take her first cry at birth and her last breath on this earth shutting down the life support machine.  This is the hardest decision in this world is to let a loved one die by shutting this device off.

You always live with the fear that if you had waited a little longer, they might have come out of the coma.  I wished God had taken her the three weeks earlier than to live on the hope that she would live, instead of shutting a machine off only to watch her heart rate slow down to a stop.  It makes you feel like you ended her life.  This is alcoholism. 

I remember Dr. Phil’s remark to the woman on his show.  “You realize you’re not going into rehabilitation for a day, week or a month.  It’s until! There is the answer.  Until you are dried-out, can make healthy decisions with your life, and face the deep-rooted problems that are eating away at you.  Only then, you may have a chance for survival. 

Who and what keeps the addicted active?  I saw on television, a football player who had been an alcoholic and addict but recovered.  His desire was to help young kids.  He made a remark to them that made me stop what I was doing. “Show me your friends, and I’ll show you your future!” Think about it.  When they get out of rehab, they run to the same friends doing the same abuse, at the same location.  They meet with the same drug dealers.

Years ago, our kids were street smart.  Today, we are not fact smart.  Our education has to start at the grammar school level.  Our children are not as innocent to things happening in their neighborhood as you think.  In my book What is and isn’t Working for the Alcoholic and Drug Addict, two contributors admitted to trying their first drink at five years old and the other at seven. 

This is why I believe we need a daily class on substance abuse with grammar age children.  By that age, our sons and daughters are mixing in with others who are looking for ways to get their thrills and they look up to the older kids.  Until they have an education these kids have no future if they continue and face death if they don’t stop.  We have to show our children the facts about the high death-rate with alcohol and drug abuse.  Doctors have to stop refilling pain pills.  They don’t take a second glance at what might be going on with the patient.  I blame them with the same actions that family do…doctors are great enablers.  Filling prescription drugs over and over makes them as responsible with their death as the pill they are taking.

Health insurance companies have to make a change in today’s life covering the cost for long term recovery programs.  They need to face the reality that substance abusers need at least a year or longer in a recovery program without coming out until their time is up with more professional help when they do.  In my past life watching Richie and Lori, I came to the conclusion, it’s not counselors substance abusers need but psychiatrist.  

Addicts have to take their own responsibility with the years of using.  They have to get real with the fact, you can’t get dry and then return to the same friends who use or the same corner to get those drug. You have to have no doubt in your mind that this continued action is going to kill you.  Not maybe, but when. 

To the school systems and families, start today teaching our children about alcohol abuse and drug use.  Do we need to put fear into them………..in my opinion, YES.  It can save their life.

 

Interview with Alberta Sequeira

       Official Apex Reviews

Interviewed Alberta Sequeira on her published book, What Is and Isn't Working for the Alcoholic and Addict: In Their Own Words.

Thanks for joining us for this interview, Alberta. We're looking forward to sharing more about your book and other efforts with our readers.

 

What inspired you to compile this rather eye-opening treatise on the lives of addicts in recovery?

My writing on addiction started from the tragedy of losing my husband, Richard Lopes and my daughter, Lori (Lopes) Cahill from North Dighton, Massachusetts from their own alcohol abuse. I wrote my books because I felt there was something important to share with substance abusers and their families. Alcohol and drug abuse are so out-of-control that even the professionals are having a hard time trying to find ways to stop the yearly death-rate from climbing. I feel that adults and our children have lost their way in learning how to handle their pain and separating what they think is fun from what may kill them.

I had already published Someone Stop This Merry-Go-Round: An Alcoholic Family in Crisis, which is about my young marriage to Richard, our ups and downs with his drinking, the confusion, fear and abuse behind closed doors, the enabling, and the effect on our two daughters, Debbie and Lori. Richie died in 1985 in the VA Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island at forty-five years of age from his drinking since his teenage years. His mother, sister, brother, daughter, niece, and nephews drank, along with past relatives. 

After losing Lori in 2006 in the Charlton Memorial Hospital in Fall River, Massachusetts at thirty-nine from the same disease, I wrote the sequel Please, God, Not Two: This Killer Called Alcoholism. I talk about Lori’s three alcoholic rehab stays and her struggle to reach sobriety. She had been admitted once to the Butler Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island and twice to Gosnold Rehabilitation Center in Falmouth, Massachusetts.  

They are open books on the reality of what happens to each individual in a family with an abusive drinker. I write about my situations with mistakes and the missed opportunities that would have been handled differently today. I could have named the books What not to do with Alcohol Abuse. I even added my talks to addicts at halfway homes, rehabs and court-ordered programs in the sequel. They are books of lessons more than being memoirs.

After Lori’s death, I started to wonder why some alcoholics and drug users recover and put their lives together while others die from this horrible, worldwide problem. What gives them the physical and mental strength to fight this battle and come out winning? These questions and the heartbreak of losing two loved ones from alcohol addiction encouraged What is and isn’t Working for the Alcoholic and Addict: In Their Own Words. I thought if I had these questions then other families did, too. Richie and Lori never opened up about their emotions or needs. I wanted to learn what addicts go through that I missed. I came from a very close and loving family and had no education or knowledge about substance abuse.

Was it difficult for you to gather together the 34 different contributors to the volume?

I realized that the only way to get the answers to my questions about the alcoholics emotions was to go directly to the source; the alcoholics and drug addicts. Who would know more than the ones who are living the life of addiction? I placed an ad online in Reporter Connection and asked if anyone was willing to tell their private stories with their own struggle overcoming their substance abuse for my book I was writing. I had to turn people away with so much response. Thirty-four substance abusers from all walks in life from the United States and Canada gave their testimonies. I left nothing out from their stories or changed a word. These are their stories. 

Were any of the contributors reluctant to share the deeper, more personal details of their lives and addictions on a public stage?

They were excited to share their battle with addiction and wanted to get a message to doctors, counselors, family members, and society to learn, not only what the addict is looking for with support to help them through their recovery, but new ways to help the addicted. Many said telling their story was a healing process for them. A few didn’t want to give their names but told where they lived. Most were direct with their names and job titles. Their stories start from as young as five years old to their present life. They didn’t hide anything with the fact that their life had been turned upside down from their drinking, what they lost, and spoke about other relatives that died from their addiction. 

How have readers reacted to the book thus far?

After reading each contributor’s story, a lot of readers realized that childhood emotional wounds mold us into what we became in adulthood, especially with living in an alcoholic family, denial, enabling, and the life we considered to be normal to us at the time. 

One girl wrote a review on Amazon, “I have learned a lot from family and friends who are in recovery and this book took it one level deeper. The stories are raw, honest and heartfelt from the people who lived through the pain and came out on the other side. I would recommend this book to family members or friends who want to know how an addict/alcoholic thinks. It's also could be a good way to open a conversation with a loved one who is struggling to come to grips with whether they have a problem. We all want to know the right way to handle things and I think Alberta's book gives us insight that there is no “right" answer that applies to every addict. Bravo to the folks telling their stories!”

John Daubney, a contributor wrote: 

“Having the addicts tell what worked for them and didn’t would be a most helpful addition to the literature on the subject of addiction and recovery.” 

Is there a central message you'd like readers to take away from the book?

Often people want to debate with me on whether addiction is hereditary, a disease, or a choice. They are all right in my eyes. Each addict has their own reason why they went down the path of drinking or taking drugs. With Richard’s family history, a lot of them over-drank and still are to the point of being alcoholics. Others start from following the crowd, like college kids or younger, thinking everyone is cool and “What’s the harm, everyone is doing it? No big deal!” They truly believe that they can stop anytime. The last reason, which I consider to be the number one, is that the person is trying to hide a horrible event from the past that devastated them and they can’t deal with the problem or can’t find the strength to get professional help. In my opinion, doctors and counselor should look more into “why” a person is using more than the action of drinking or using drugs.  

I want readers to know that What is and isn’t Working for the Alcoholic and Addict is not only for substance abusers but for family members to learn how to help the alcoholic and what not to do; an example, innocently, our enabling brings them deeper into their addiction. We as a family live in denial as much as the user. The contributors to this book are trying to tell us what they need to recover. 

My greatest achievement with this book would be to see the interest to add it to any educational programs in libraries, school programs, or sitting on the bookshelves in all bookstores. It’s a book for the whole family. This book was published by me, but the contributors are the ones trying to save lives who are connected to alcohol and drug addiction. 

Family members reach the point of being emotionally and physically drained trying to help the alcoholic. I had a small breakdown from the years of fighting to control Richie’s drinking. I pushed my body and mind beyond what it could take instead of realizing that the addict has to help themselves. We can only love and support them. 

Please share more with our readers about your other writings.

I had dreams of traveling to tropical islands during my retirement, but God had other plans for me. As I mentioned, I became a writer from the tragedy in my life.

My writing started with my father’s death in 1990 when he died of cancer. I was going to write a book for my family so I could leave his military history to all our generations. Albert L. Gramm was a Brigadier General in the Army and was one of the commanding officers of the 26th Yankee Division during WWII and fought in Metz, Lorraine and the famous Battle of the Bulge. To get information on his life, I went to the Yankee Doings Magazine and asked if anyone knew him. I received personal calls, pictures, emails, and letters from his fellow servicemen. One man sent me the full bio of his life during WWII. 

During my father’s cancer, he wanted to go to Medjugorje in Bosnia because of the miracles happening there since 1981 with six visionaries having ten secrets given to them on a daily basis, and up to this day, from The Blessed Mother that will be revealed to the world when they all get all of them. There are two visionaries left to get one more secret. One by one, a priest will read them. 

I took the ten-day pilgrimage for my father after his death and my life changed forever being in the visionary’s company while they had apparitions with Our Lady. I believe that trip helped me deal with the loss of Lori. 

That's how my first book A Spiritual Renewal: A Journey to Medjugorje got in the works. I added the miracles that happened to me that got me to this tiny, remote village to the book along with my relationship with my father. 

The other two memoirs, Someone Stop This Merry-Go-Round: An Alcoholic Family in Crisis and the sequel, Please, God, Not Two: This Killer Called Alcoholism, on alcohol abuse in our family followed. I have completed my personal stories about my life with pain and finding my way back in life.

In addition to being an author, you're also an experienced director, producer, and Co-host to a cable TV show as well as a continuing educational instructor. Please share more with our readers about your endeavors in those fields.

My other titles came from becoming a co-founder with three other authors and named our group Authors Without Borders (www.awb6.com). We discovered that it cost us less dividing the expense with festivals or other events. We co-authored with our first book Loose Ends. It is a book of diverse collections of intriguing and insightful short stories, poems, and book excerpts that we hope will quench a reader’s thirst and captivate their imagination and emotions.  The four of us are more than authors. Our backgrounds would amaze readers. We also teach at colleges, libraries and other locations with writing, talks, poetry reading or book signings. 

We then went to a class at the NBTV-95 Cable Show in New Bedford, Massachusetts to learn how to have a cable show and developed Authors Without Borders Presents. It was fun learning to run the cameras and direct the program. We interview other writers, authors, managers of bookstores, poets, and publishers. We are hoping people who are interested in learning what faces them in the publishing world would have the desire to watch and learn what others go through to help them. One of our members, Willie Pleasants, has her own cable show called Willie’s Web out of Boston, Massachusetts with the Boston Neighborhood Network. We interview authors in that area on her show. People can become Associated Members on our site and we will give them an interview and a spot on our website. They can email us at [email protected]

As for my continuing education as an instructor, I listened to the telephone workshop programs for free with Steve Harrison, and he had someone explain the difference with a poor author and a rich one. The poor one is happy with just selling books at bookstores, while the rich one looks for ways to grow with their hidden talent, so I developed three-three hour workshops: “Bring Your Manuscript to Publication”,   “How to Self-Publish Your Own Book with Create Space,” and Writing Memoirs. 

I took my pain from my husband and daughter’s loss and became a Motivational Speaker on Alcohol and Drug Abuse and go wherever I get invited to talk. It’s hard to believe that I would never talk in front of people.

What's next for you?

I am now having fun with working on my first fictional The Rusty Years; The Remembrance of Being Young. Hopefully, it will be completed next year. Right now The Wild Rose Press requested a query letter from me. I want my followers and readers to see a lighter side of me. No more memoirs. My personal life is out there for the world to see. 

I am open to speaking on the topic of “The Effect of Alcoholism on the Whole Family” or “My Spiritual Change Within” from my trip to Medjugorje if someone sends for a quote. 

Willie Pleasants is trying to give me the courage to open my own cable show on the topic of addiction. I just edited my first standalone video on the cable show due out soon. Something I will be thinking about in the future.

How can our readers learn more about you and your ongoing efforts?

I have a lot of articles on the Internet once you key my name in to find anything about me. Or you can go to my blog on WordPress titled “Choices” at www.albertasequeira.wordpress.com. My blog for writers and authors is www.albertasequeira.org.

How can they contact you directly?

Send me an email at [email protected], and I’ll be happy to reply back. I love to hear from people.

Any final thoughts you'd like to share?

Never give up on wanting to write. We all have a story hidden in us. You may think no one would be interested, but write for you. Don’t write what you think people want to read but send a message to them that will help in their life with stress and struggles with problems. Send something funny in a fictional book. We all need a laugh in the terrible news around the world.  If you talk about what you know during a presentation or at a book signing, readers will want to buy your book(s). Writing has to be fun, not boring or a chore. Take a day off from the computer if you are forcing yourself to write. 

Where can readers find your books?

They can go directly to www.amazon.com/author/albertasequeira and all my published paperback and Kindle books will show up. 

Thanks again, Alberta, and best of continued success to you in all your endeavors!

Alberta Sequeira's interviews with Authors on the NBTV-95 Cable TV Show

 

Alberta

Being an author, I realize the honor and opportunity of being on a cable television show to help get other authors, publishers, bookstores or artist noticed with your published books or your other talents.

Since I’ve become a producer, director, and co-host to the NBTV-95 Cable TV Station in New Bedford, Massachusetts, I’ve been thrilled to interview people who talk about their struggles getting to the top. This gives them time on the air and the half-hour opens doors for me to learn about others trying to fit into the world of publishing.

Each month, I enjoy asking a person to be my guest on the cable show. Check our scheduling at http://www.newbedfordma.gov/CableAccess/Channel%2095/ProgramSchedule.html

Tune in and hear the pros and cons of others who got published. What roadblocks did they face? We want the listeners to learn from all our mistakes. We’re listed under Authors Without Borders (www.awb6.com).

The handsome man running the camera is my husband, Al Sequeira. He helps when our other stagehands are tied-up with other events. Doesn’t he look like a natural?

Al at NBTV-95

Interviews by Alberta Sequeira, Host of the NBTV-95 Cable TV
Welcome to the official web site of NBTV95, Public Access Television in New Bedford, Massachusetts. Author and Speaker, Alberta Sequeira, is a co-host to this network. Check their listing on the website below for all their upcoming shows. http://www.newbedford-ma.gov/CableAccess/Channel%2095/WelcomeNBTV95.html

Steven Manchester: Author, Poet, Author, poet, and speaker, Steven Manchester, and his seven-year-old daughter, Isabella, where interviewed with his new children’s book Bella Bean. Steven has written 16 books (with 12 in publication) and has contributed to more than three dozen international anthologies. When not spending time with his children, writing, teaching, or promoting his published books/films, this Massachusetts author speaks publicly to troubled children through the Straight Ahead Program. Visit his website at http://www.stevenmanchester.com.

steven-manchester

To view all his numerous books, go to his personal page at: http://www.amazon.com/Steven-Manchester/e/B001K8Y14C/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1402670237&sr=1-2-ent

Dr. Julia

Julia Schlum Eldelman, MD

Alberta Sequeira interviewed Julia Schlam Edelman, M.D. with her book Menopause Matters. Dr. Edelman, M.D., F.A.C.O.G., is a board-certified gynecologist, a certified menopause clinician, a Clinical Instructor at Harvard Medical School, an Adjunct Clinical Instructor at Brown Medical School and a Fellow of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. She is in private practice in Massachusetts. Menopause Matters covers the full spectrum of topics of vital interest to perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. Visit her website at http://www.juliaedelmanmd.com. Her book is available on Amazon.

Stephanie Blackman

Stephanie Blackman, Publisher
 
Interview with Stephanie Blackman, publisher of Riverhaven Books.

Stephanie Blackman has always enjoyed reading and working with others to improve their writing skills. As an English professor at a local community college, Stephanie has a strong background in composition as well as literature. Riverhaven Books is a perfect fit for her skillset. Stephanie graduated from Eastern Nazarene College in Quincy, MA, with a double major in English and Secondary Education. She taught at both the junior high and high school level for several years. Now she is married and has two boys, ages five and nine. “I live a well-rounded life doing what I love. I spend time with my family, teach literature and writing, and get to read fantastic books and interact with wonderful authors. I look forward to watching Riverhaven Books continue to grow.” ~Stephanie

Let me first clarify that Riverhaven is not a vanity press; not every work meets the standards of Riverhaven Books. However, publication through Riverhaven is not a requirement in order to employ our other services. You provide a manuscript, and we’ll work with you to edit it, format it, and design the final product. Hands-on is the philosophy of Riverhaven. Our attention to detail, while maintaining affordability, is what sets us apart. 

Because we are a small and newer company, writers maintain control over the number of books printed and are responsible for that payment. In turn, 

Riverhaven does not take any of the profits from the sale of those books. It’s a mutually beneficial relationship. And we look forward to working with you. To book stores looking to purchase copies of our titles, please know that we offer a standard 40% discount. Riverhaven also has a return policy. Please contact Stephanie at [email protected] for more information.

Visit her website: www.riverhavenbooks.com

Tom Cirignano

Tom M. Cirignano, Author

Interview with author, Thomas M. Cirignano, at the NBTV-95 Cable Station on the Authors Without Borders Presents show.

Tom owned and operated an auto repair shop on East Third Street in the heart of South Boston. He experienced, first hand, those history-making years when crime and violence ruled the streets. Southie was in turmoil, with both the Irish and Italian Mobs vying for complete control.

Thomas Cirignano compiled his notes and memories of South Boston to create his first book, The Constant Outsider, Memoirs of a South Boston Mechanic. His experiences were anything but typical or ordinary, surreal by most people’s standards.

His second book is a fictional adaptation of the first. Within67 Cents: Creation of a Killer, Tom takes a different path than he did in real life, saying “Yes” to each and every offer that was made to him by the Mob. Tom stated, “I’ve always wondered what my life would have been like if I had become one of them.”

Visit Tom’s website at http://www.theconstantoutsider.com.

Bob_Branco
Bob Branco, Author

Alberta Sequeira, the host to the NBTV-95 Cable TV Show, interviewed Bob Branco from New Bedford, Massachusetts.

This book is about eight of the most important years of Mr. Branco’s life. Just like anyone else between the ages of 12 and 19, he had a lot to learn about growing up. However, contrary to what most pre-teens and teens experience, he lived those eight years at Perkins School for the Blind, in Watertown, Massachusetts; 65 miles from his home. ​In the book, Mr. Branco talks about their academic classes, the teachers and other adults at the school; the many kids who became his friends and others who made friendship impossible, along with the several sports they pursued. There were the rules they had to follow and how radically they were sometimes broken. You’ll read some of the fascinating field trips that were taken and new technology that was explored. 

Learn how the school prepared the students for independent living, and much more. As you will read, there were plenty of both good and bad times. His story puts a unique perspective on what it’s like for any teenager, blind or sighted, to live away from home for eight years and hopes that the sighted, as well as the blind, will enjoy and appreciate his story.

Bob’s book Home Away from Home can be purchased at http://www.amazon.com

Author, Julie Broomall

julia Broomall

     Julia Broomall was born in Pennsylvania but has lived all over the country. She has three children and seven grandchildren, one of whom has been labeled “special needs”.
     Julia is a holistic healer, using Reiki, Theta Therapy, Quantum Touch, Intuitive Anatomy, Angel Cards, and Spirit Communications to help her clients. 

     Before becoming a holistic healer, she worked as a substitute teacher and an arts and crafts teacher. The author also worked for a toy manufacturer as a receptionist, clerk, Human Resource Director, and trade show office manager. 

Julia now resides on Florida’s West Coast where she is just turning a new page in her life as a successful published author. The Emperor’s New Throne is the first book in the series The Whole Story. It’s a subtle, moral tale about an incident that changes not only the king’s physical abilities​ but also his mental outlook and that of his kingdom. 

The story helps all children and families alike to understand that those being labeled as “special needs” or “handicapped” are just as capable and whole as everyone else in their own way​ and that every one of us has a special talent. Julie is in the process of having the second book published by Sweet Dreams Publishing of Mass in a few months. All the books will tell how disability is something a person can overcome. 

These books are a great buy for children with parents coming home from the war with injuries. You can purchase The Emperor’s New Throne on Amazon http://www.amazon.com/Emperors-Throne-%2522The-Story%2522-Childrens/dp/0982925611/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1371211856&sr=1-1&keywords=Julia+broomall

Visit Julie’s website at www.juliabroomall.com or email her at [email protected].

Radio Host: Phil Paleologos

Phil Paleologos

TALKERS MAGAZINE named Phil as one of the nation’s Top 100 Talk Show Hosts! 45-year​ veteran broadcaster, Phil Paleologos began his passion in radio at KZNG in Hot Springs, Arkansas, as a 16-year-old​ who convinced management to let him host a one hour show about local high school events, and since then, he hasn’t stopped talking! 

Serving as both a television news anchor and DJ in Charlottesville, VA, Phil learned his craft well in the smaller markets and then set his sights on Boston as the afternoon drive-time host on WEZE, as ‘The Mayor of Park Square’. In the late 1970s​, Phil became the morning guy at WNBH and later, an afternoon host at WBSM, both in New Bedford, MA. In the mid-1990s​, the TALK-AMERICA RADIO NETWORK syndicated Phil’s morning show, American Breakfast, that originated in his authentic stainless steel diner, that he and his wife own! 

The show was carried coast-to-coast, in many major city markets, until he signed off with great ratings. Since then, Phil has been very active in helping non-profit organizations raise awareness and revenues and owning and operating the Shawmut Diner in New Bedford, MA, with his wife, Celeste. 

Tune into “More Than Just Talk” with Phil every weekday morning from 10am to 1pm. Read More: Phil Paleologos – WBSM – New Bedford’s Local Source For News, Talk, and Sports! http://wbsm.com/author/wbsmphil/?trackback=tsmclip

Phil is now the host to the WBSM 1420Am station out of Fairhaven.  Turn in at 10 am to listen to him.

 

If any author wants to be interviewed contact Alberta by email. If you are a writer just starting out or have not been published yet, I would love to hear about your struggles trying to get your work in print. 

The interview tapes of the show are available for $20.00. 

Alberta Sequeira
[email protected]
Order books directly at www.amazon.com/author/albertasequeira ​

Intervention

man praying on hill

Why do we have to wait for an intervention to try to reach our loved one fighting addiction? I wish I had thought of this before I lost my husband and daughter.

This may sound like a crazy action but think about it. When you talk to them they don’t want to hear what you're saying. They don’t want your advice. They block you out. First of all, don’t try to make any connection when they're in a fog from using. 

If you send them a loving letter, they will read it. Maybe they won’t like what you’re saying, but they won’t be blocking you out. It gives you time to “think” about what you want to say.

Never knock them with their behavior or their personality. Don’t throw blame at them. They need to hear you love them and that you are scared to death with losing them. Don’t say you love them, show it.

One night, I received a call that my daughter had been staying at a friend’s home, and they wanted her out. She was not paying rent. At that time, it had been months that we had no idea where she was or in what condition. 

lori-water-raffing
Lori

We went to bring her home. It was a comfort mentally knowing she was with us. I sat on the couch and she put the back of her head against my chest. I ran my fingers through her matted hair. I wrapped my arms around her. It gave Lori such solace her remark to me was, “You don’t know how good it feels with your arms around me.” 

I have never forgotten those words. You see, Lori died eight months later at thirty-nine and I never held her in my arms again. That moment was embedded in my mind and heart. It showed how much she needed her family as she hopped from one place to another alone.  So, so many things I would have done differently.  As parents, we miss the way to handle the alcoholics. What do they want, need, or desire? 

I wanted the answers. Thirty-nine alcoholics, drug, and prescription users contributed their stories to me from the USA and Canada. They were asked: “Are there other family members who have an addiction, what age did you start, why did you, how did you recover, what do you need to help you desire the want for professional help? What do you think works and doesn’t in our recovery programs?" Many more questions. 

These answers from all show the family, counselor, doctors, and society what they need. This is a book for all, not just the addicted. Here is a book you can read and then leave on a table for your loved one to read at their want. The contributors talk to them. You don’t have to.  It is a great educational book for schools, libraries, and rehabilitation centers.  One person told me they read it as a family and discussed every separate story and how it affected them.  

The book is What is and isn’t Working for the Alcoholic and Addict; In Their Own Words. Your childhood life is what defines you as an adult. It can be purchased at www.amazon.com/author/albertasequeira.

BookCoverPreview.do

Need a speaker at your location?  Email me at [email protected]

Alberta Sequeira

Get out of denial

beer_5

How many of you look at beer as a non-alcoholic drink?  You’re not an alcoholic if you drink beer and stay away from hard liquor.  False! Open your eyes. Beer is liquor that can help you become an alcoholic. 

How many think, if you can drink and get up for work the day after heavy binge drinking, that you’re not an alcoholic? You can hold down your job. You meet your bills. 

My husband, Richard Lopes of North Dighton, Massachusetts had his own television repair shop down our cellar. His business was successful. People knew him in town and his family was well respected. 

84419-6bfc91_429c3fa52bbf43c7b01c5ffd7e57036emv2 Richard Lopes

Richie’s family had a history of alcoholics. Something I learned after our marriage.

Before opening his own business, he had worked for a television company in Somerset, Massachusetts. A bar was next door named the Elbow Room. A perfect setting for an alcoholic or one to be made. Slowly and repeatedly, he and his boss went for a drink after work. This was a daily routine Monday through Friday. 

I could push the button to a recording machine hearing, “I’ll be late for supper. We have to discuss some problems we had today. Don’t wait for me. I’ll eat when I get home.” Many nights my daughters and I eat alone. 

I spent my time looking up at the clock around 5 pm. I knot started in my stomach with no arrival for supper. What condition and time would he be coming home? We had two beautiful daughters, Debbie and Lori. They were four years apart and this started when Debbie was around six years old. Lori had been two. 

When Saturday and Sunday arrived, with liquor in the house, he never drank. In time, Saturday became a weekday with work. He never drank or over-drank visiting family. He was always stone sober. Monday would roll around and again, the drinking started. The hours coming home got later and later.

Because of this so-called “control ”, Richie believed he had no problem. Allowing this to go on with making no demands, only made our household become toxic. His light, happy drinking mood switched to blackouts. I was abused and our daughters saw things that children should not witness. Shame on me. I put him before our children. I should have been protecting them.  I became a huge enabler.

Richie died in 1985 at forty-five years of age at the VA Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island. I didn’t make him an alcoholic but I added to the problem with putting blinders on each day. It brought him deeper into his addiction.

I wrote about the reality of our lives, with nothing held back, in Someone Stop This Merry-Go-Round; An Alcoholic Family in Crisis. Learn from my mistakes and do something about bad drinking behavior as soon as it starts. When is it a problem? When it causes problems. 

The books can be bought at www.amazon.com/author/albertasequeira. The sequel with our daughter, Lori Cahill, and her use of alcohol and drugs brought her death at thirty-nine years of age is in Please, God, Not Two; This Killer Called Alcoholism. It's at the same link. 

Richie and Lori have been buried together at the St. Patrick Cemetery in Somerset, Massachusetts. Don’t wait for that to happen to your loved one.  Need a speaker for your event?  Email me at [email protected]

 

Someone Stop This Merry-Go-Round
​​
Please, God, Not Two

So sad avoiding help

ENABLING

I went to an Author’s Expo last night and met seventeen new author friends. What was sad was how many people are affected by a loved one’s drinking. One man was divorcing after thirty-five years of trying to help his wife give up her drinking. I’ve been there, done it. We chattered, and hopefully, he left with some encouragement to go on and pray she sees her life in reality and gets help. 

I could hear and see the draining hope that left him, and more so, the love he still had for his wife and marriage. I had a small breakdown during those hard times trying to “save” my husband. It took all these years after his death in 1985 dying at forty-five, and years of learning, they have to want the help to recover. Meantime, the wives or husbands turn ourselves inside out trying to find the way for them. We remember the fights and abuse because we were sober during those hours, while they remained in blackout not remembering what they said or did.

The pain comes when the disease distroys their organs and we watch them die. Nothing is more painful than to give the doctor permission to take life support off your loved one. I watched my daughter, Lori, come into this world, and watched her take her last breathe leaving us as the machine went flat. A death that could have been preventable. As a non-drinker or drug user, we can’t fathom how they can’t reach out to get professional help to live. 

There is no way of healing without admitting first that you have a problem; wanting the help, giving up and staying away from your drinking or drug user friends, don’t attend their parties you know the use will be easy, don’t meet that drug dealer around the corner; don’t follow your friend to give “them” support, or go back to your habit because it is easier than trying to get clean.

Remember one thing; those people you think are your friends would surprise you. If you died today, they would pick right up with someone else to hang out with to drag down to their level of drowning in their habit with substance abuse. It’s true…”misery loves company.” 

Changes! A frightful thought and action. You’re so used to doing nothing but drink, use drugs, or overuse prescription drugs, that your lost on how to fill your days. Your mind was never clear enough to remember or worry about what you did.

Now, you face reality. Scary! Anything new is. Giving a speech is just as panicky. Substance abusers have to go through the step with drying out. That alone takes a toll on your mind and body coming down; the shakes, body aches, hallucinations, depression, clammy skin, fatigue, insomnia, irritability, mood swings, or serious seizures. Instead of being petified seeing the results, realize these are symptoms your drinking and drug use are doing to your body. 

Lets jump ahead to recovery. There is no cure for alcohol abuse except staying away from it. Miracles have happened to others and they come out of their actions with no problems. Don’t ever go “cold turkey” and stop all at once. See professionals to help you. This could kill you. 

I have never had a problem with drinking so I can’t judge the ones who do. Seeing my husband and daughter die from it, I have one drink…once or twice a year, and stop. Never had two. Does it make me better than you? No. I’m lucky not to have that gene where I can’t stop. 

So my friend, throw in God or Who you call your Higher Power. You’ll never be alone. Go to your place of worship. Make friends with people with ambitions, love their families, believe in God, stay active without substance abuse, get a hobby, sign up to go to school to get the degree you want (don’t have money, look for organizations that will fund your schooling), go to meetings and only hook up with the ones serious with recovery, or help in your community. 

I pray daily for substance abusers. I talk at event in private or publicly to give you strength, let you remember you’re worth something, learn to believe in yourself, and continue on the path for good mental and phyical health. You fall? Get right up again and walk to the light.

Alberta Sequeira
Talk to me or schedule a talk at your location:
Email: albertasequeira.gmail.com

Book Signing

Authors Expo

Alberta Sequeira will be at the Apponequat Regional HS library with other authors signing books. The event is a one-night, Friday May 17th, from 5-8 pm. Come vist and introduce your self. The address is 100 E Howland Road, Lakeville, MA.

Author Alberta Sequeira's Younger Days

 

OCTOBER 2, 2016
 
 

Lets start with my “real” younger years. Believe it or not, I am a twin. My brother came into the world before me..twenty minutes? 
His name was Albert, named after our father. June 4, 2016, Albert died from lung cancer. 

I’m the one with the stylish hat. I still love to dress up and look my best. I try to get woman to wear hats in church. I am told I still look stylish… even though I’m the only one.

I'm the stylish one with the hat.

Here is Albert sitting peacefully on top of me. He always wanted to win at everything. There’s the hat again. It must have brought me attention wearing one and Albert was trying to take my fame away. 

Here we are in our playpen. Do any of you remember them? I’m on the left watching Albert probably getting attention from Mom. In those days, parents must have blessed those corrals. Can’t imagine running after two small babies going in two different directions from curiosity outside our enclosed area.

Here I am again on the right pouting while Albert is smiling. I probably got yelled at for something he did. 

Look at the “old” carriage in the background. Wow, that was a long time ago.

Alberta Sequeira

Email: [email protected]

Here is more about Alberta Sequeira

Here is a book, not only for the substance abusers, but for family members, society, doctors, and counselors to learn, not only what the addict is looking for with support to help them through with their recovery, but new ways to help the addicted. You will learn that childhood emotional wounds mold us into what we become in adulthood. 

What is and isn’t Working for the Alcoholic and Addict is a book of personal stories by thirty-four alcoholics and drug users from all walks of life. The first few years of recovery in substance abuse contain numerous pitfalls which addicts in recovery must have the right kind of help with. The best-intention of friends, family, lovers, and co-workers can be healthy supports or obstacles to long-term sobriety. Addicts sharing their experience, strength, and hope with others is something that only a recovering addict or alcoholic can do. It is a unique gift. 

This book contains the testimonies of individuals who were or are actively in a recovery program and wanted to share their habit and actions with their struggles trying to overcome their own addiction. Their main goal is to help others who are fighting with their recovery and sobriety. These are their own stories on how their addiction led to the devastation of losing control of their life, family, friends and the death of other family members from this disease we call Alcoholism. Their desire is to lift other substances abusers, especially young people, in learning the reality that it’s not that drinking and taking drugs may, could or would kill. It will. 

Hopefully, the heartfelt honesty from the participants will help doctors and counselors to use their stories for their own study on what may be missing in the treatment methods.

The personal testaments within What is and isn’t Working for the Alcoholic and Addict is an added tool as to how people are affected, and how they suffer long-term drinking habits from living in an active alcoholic family. As one contributor wrote, “I was tired of getting sick, my hands shaking, my vision deteriorating, my nose bleeding, my bowels moving sporadically, the violence and running from many situations being paranoid to the point of staying home all day (I had a job, a husband, family), not sleeping and not feeling safe.” 

What alcoholic or addict is not going to relate to these emotions?

Editorial Review:Light in the darkness

Rarely has anyone book described a solution to such a devastating public and personal health issue, in such a variety of voices and pathways, as does Alberta Sequeira’s “What is and isn’t Working for the Alcoholic.”

In this era of ever-increasing addiction to all types of substances including drugs and the ever-ongoing problem of alcohol addiction and abuse, this book offers hope and enlightenment to the addict and to those who love them and to the general public. There are few people whose lives have not been touched in some way by this epidemic. Frustration, chronic fear, worry, helplessness, and hopelessness characterize those of us who attempt to help or even control the downward spiral we witness in those we care about who are addicted or affected by these diseases. Without help, we stand little chance of breaking free from these chains.

This amazing book, however, offers hope and direction through the stories of those who have been there in the “trenches” – the addict and those who love them. This book identifies through the stories of those who have contributed that there are many “roads up the mountain” of freedom. It’s up to each of us to choose which path we will take.

Thank you, Alberta, for your courage and for your passion for helping those affected by this illness and showing us that this illness is not hopeless, and can, in fact, through recovery be the doorway into a new life.

Review by John R. Daubney, author of “Those Who Walk with Fire: Everyday People Discuss the Passion That Fuels Their Extraordinary Lives

 

From The Author: I want substance abusers
to know these important messages in my book: Choices: The word is
powerful.  Realize the meaning when you
are faced with taking that other drink or buying that drug down the street.  Choices, if someone calls you to go to his or
her party with alcohol or drugs. 

Show me your friends and I’ll show you your future. 
Stop hanging out with those who have no desire at all to recover.

First, you can do this.  You can recover.  Think it in your mind and want it more than life itself in your heart.

Get rid of the garbage in your life by talking to counselors or doctors.  It’s a step to healing.

It takes more for a person to ask for help than the ones too scared to take the step and keep on the same “death” path.

Forgive the person who hurt you.  You don’t have to keep them in your life.  Give it up to God for Him to heal you.  Forgiving moves you toward recovery.  Let it go.

I learned writing this book that family can only love and support the
addict.  They have to do the work to recover.  They have to want it.

I had the contributors write their feelings in this book with their struggle with reaching sobriety because I wanted to know what happened to my husband, Richie and my daughter, Lori.  What did they
need from me that I didn’t supply?

I want families and substance abusers to realize the mistakes I made along the way. 

Book Genre: Narrative Non-Fiction

Product Details:
Paperback: 360 Pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (September 25, 2013)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1492138290
ISBN-13: 978-1492138297
Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.9 x 9 inches

Amazon Customer Reviews:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1492138290/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_bibl_vppi_i4#customerReviews

Amazon Print:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1492138290/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_bibl_vppi_i4

Kindle:
https://www.amazon.com/What-isnt-Working-Alcoholic-Addict-ebook/dp/B00FY7DG3C/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

About The Author: Start out by watching Alberta’s interview with Sheriff Thomas Hodgson from The Bristol County Jail & House of Corrections at 400 Faunce Corner, Dartmouth, MA 02747:

Interview Link: https://vimeo.com/album/3341606/video/254517198

Alberta H. Sequeira was born in Pocasset, Massachusetts. Her father, Albert L. Gramm, had been a Brigadier General in the Army and one of the commanding officers of the 26th Yankee Division during WWII fighting in the battles of Metz, Lorraine and The Battle of the Bulge. She spent her childhood in various towns across the different states traveling. She lives in North Dartmouth, Massachusetts with her husband, Al.

They have five children, and lost their daughter, Lori Cahill, in 2006 and her first husband, Richard Lopes, from their alcohol addiction. From these children, they were blessed with ten grandchildren. June of 2016, Al & Alberta were blessed with three “great-grandchildren. Isabel was born first in, Charlie was next followed by Lori’s daughter, Meagan, having a son, Brady, in October.

Ms. Sequeira is a four-time award-winning author, a Motivational Speaker, and an Awareness Coach on Alcohol and Drug Abuse for private and public events after the loss of her husband and daughter from North Dighton, Massachusetts. She is the producer, director, and co-host of the NBTV-95 Cable TV Station out of New Bedford, Massachusetts. Ms. Sequeira is a weekly writer for the Cape Cod Today blog at (http://www.capecodtoday.com/blogs/Journey)

***All Alberta’s paperbacks are offered in Kindle books. She is always excited to receive reviews from readers and getting emails.

Her first memoir A Spiritual Renewal: A Journey to Medjugorje is about her relationship with her father and learning too late about his remarkable military life fighting throughout Europe during WWII. After her father’s death, three miracles happen to her that leads her on a trip to Medjugorje in Bosnia. A ten-day pilgrimage to this tiny, remote village allowed her to witness four out of six visionaries having apparitions daily with The Blessed Mother. Their first vision was in 1981 and still continuing today (2016). They are receiving 10 secrets each and when they get them all, they will be revealed to the world. The priest has already been chosen to present them. There are only two visionaries left to get one more secret.

Her second memoir, Someone Stop This Merry-Go-Round; An Alcoholic Family in Crisis, is about her young life married to her alcoholic husband, Richard Lopes of North Dighton, Massachusetts and their two daughters who lived behind closed doors in silence with confusion and fear. It’s a roller coaster with Richie’s struggle trying to combat his addiction. Join her on a merry-go-round of her own enabling to only bring him deeper into his addiction. In 1985, Richie died at the VA Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island at 45 years old from cirrhosis of the liver. It’s a book of reality with families living with an alcoholic.

The sequel Please, God, Not Two; This Killer Called Alcoholism is the continuation of their lives after Richie’s death, and the story follows her daughter, Lori Cahill, going down the same path as her father. On November 22, 2006, after three rehabilitation stays, Lori died at 39 years old at the Charlton Memorial Hospital in Fall River from the same horrible, worldwide disease. The story follows all the hardships Lori developed from drinking and the pain of her struggle in and out of rehabs. This book contains some of the author’s speaking engagements behind closed doors to alcoholic abusers at halfway homes and substance abuse rehabilitation centers.

What is and isn’t Working for the Alcoholics and Addicts; In Their Own Words is a Narrative Non-Fiction book of testimonies from thirty-four recovering alcoholics and drug addicts from all walks of life from the United States and Canada telling what they believe does and does not work in their recovery programs. Hopefully, these honest testimonies will help others fighting the same battle and heading down this same destructive path and for family members to learn from them how they are suffering physically and mentally from their substance abuse. They want to reach doctors, counselors, family members and society on what they believe is needed for support for them to desire professional help.

She is working on her first fictional The Rusty Years.
Alberta wants readers to know there is a lighter side to her.

In 2013, Alberta and Al met with Stephen Meunier, who at the time had been the Policy Advisor to Senator John Kerry, in his office located in Boston, Massachusetts. They presented ways to try to modify the Patient Privacy Act to help alcoholics, drug addicts, the mentally ill and their families.

Reader Views of Austin, Texas had awarded A Spiritual Renewal; A Journey to Medjugorje the Reviewers Choice Award 2008 Semi-Finalist. Allbooks Review of Canada had nominated her memoirs Someone Stop This Merry-Go-Round with the “Editor’s Choice Award” and was nominated for the “Dan Poynter’s Global eBook Award 2011.” The sequel, Please, God, Not Two was also nominated for the “Editor’s Choice Award 2010” and appeared in the December 20, 2010, issue of Publishers Weekly.

She is a Continuing Education instructor for two three- hour writer’s workshops titled Bring Your Manuscript to Publication, How to Self-Publish Your Own Book with Create Space, and Writing Memoirs. All are published as handbooks with Amazon in paperback and Kindle.

 

Alberta is a co-founder to Authors Without Borders,” (www.awb6.com) with three other authors who offer their services with speaking engagements, readings, panel discussions, book signing, poetry slams and workshops at schools, bookstores, businesses, and libraries.

Alberta has now had the opportunity to give talks to the men and women in jails. It was a great chance to reach out and give them hope with the choices they have to recover.

Amazon Author’s Page: http://www.amazon.com/author/albertasequeira

 

 

 

 

Professional Website: http://www.albertasequeira.wordpress.com

 

 

 

 

Professional Blog: http://www.albertasequeira/org

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